Use Of The Internet

All employees must use this resource responsibly and recognise that that their use of the internet may be neither confidential nor secure.

Whilst the private use of the internet if used in moderation is acceptable, it is a privilege, not a right, which may temporarily be revoked at any time for abusive conduct.  Excessive abuse will be seen as a breach of Company regulations, and any misuse may constitute a serious disciplinary offence, which could result in dismissal.  Such misuse would include:

Types of use which could cause congestion of our connection to the internet, for example downloading any files without approval from it support (extension 377).  This includes, but is not limited to:

v  Programs and utilities

v  Screensavers

v  Music files (including streaming files)

v  Movie files (including streaming files)

v  Large picture files (with the exception of files needed for business use)

v  The use of internet chat services, such as ICQ or jabber, etc.

v  Viewing or downloading content of an explicit sexual or violent nature

v  Viewing or downloading content of an illegal nature (see below) including stolen copyrighted material

v  The use of our systems for any type of illegal activity (e.g.  Breaking into remote systems, fraud, theft, sending viruses, issuing threats, etc.)

v  Accessing hate sites or content that could be reasonably considered as slanderous

v  The use of abusive or otherwise objectionable language in either public or private messages or web pages

v  The sending or receiving of code that is likely to result in the loss of work or systems

v  Types of use which could interfere with the work of others

v  Use by an individual for business purposes not related to the Company’s business

This list is not exhaustive and must not be treated as such.  If you are not clear about any regulation ask your Manager for further explanation.

Your use of the internet may be monitored to ensure that it complies with this policy and any abuse will be reported to the HR department to be dealt with in accordance with the Company disciplinary procedure.

5.1   Use Of E-Mail

E-mail creates the facility for rapid communication and information sharing both inside and outside of our business group.  E-mail is a form of publication and should be thought of as a letter – it is not a casual and transient method of communication like the telephone.  The content of an e-mail message could be requested and used in evidence in the case of legal disputes.

In order to protect the Company and all our employees from possible prosecution or other legal process and to safeguard sensitive business information, it is essential that the Company regulations and code of conduct outlined below are understood and observed.

Whilst the private use of e-mail if used in moderation is acceptable, it is a privilege, not a right, which may temporarily be revoked at any time for abusive conduct.  Excessive abuse will be seen as a breach of Company regulations, and any misuse may constitute a serious disciplinary offence which could result in dismissal.  Such conduct would include:

v  Sending and opening non-business attachments, either internally or externally (unless approved by it or HR).

v  Subscribing to non-business mailing lists

v  Intentional impersonation and/or misrepresentation

v  Modifying a message and forwarding without noting the changes (deletion, removal of recipients, modifying content, etc.)

v  Fabricating a message and/or a sender of a message

v  Forwarding Company sensitive information to inappropriate internal and external sources

v  Use of defamatory, malicious or idle gossip or criticism of other companies or individuals

v  Use of foul or offensive language or content

v  Unwelcome sexual or personal attention, harassment, bullying or intimidation of colleagues

v  Actively participating in e-mail chain letters

v  Sending unsolicited e-mails (also known as spamming or junk e-mails)

v  Knowingly burdening the corporate network (e.g.: forwarding large attachments to a wide distribution list)

v  Use by an individual for business purposes not related to the Company’s business.

This list is not exhaustive and must not be treated as such.  If you are not clear about any regulation ask your Manager for further explanation.

Your use of e-mail may be monitored to ensure that it complies with this policy and any abuse will be reported to the HR department to be dealt with in accordance with the Company disciplinary procedure.

E-Mail Code Of Conduct

There are many different guides to “net etiquette” and you may have seen some.  Here, we summarise the key issues to cover e-mail:

v  While the e-mail system will support messages and attachments up to c.  3mb, there are better methods for transferring large files (e.g. Ftp, isdn, vio).  Please contact it support (extension 377) for further details.

v  Remember, do not send non-business related attachments

v  If you see an attachment on an e-mail you have received, and you are unsure what it is, do not open or run it as it may contain a virus.  Please contact it support for assistance

v  Check e-mail daily and remain within your limited disk quota

v  Delete unwanted messages immediately since they take up disk storage.

v  Never assume your e-mail messages are always private, or that they can be read by only yourself or the recipient.  There is a chance some messages can be intercepted, although it is unlikely there will be any systematic interception.  In addition, e-mails can be archived onto a server, and may be monitored.

v  Keep paragraphs and messages short and to the point

v  Focus on one main subject per message and always include a pertinent subject title for the message – that way the user can locate the message quickly

v  Include your reply details at the bottom of e-mail messages when communicating with people who may not know you personally.  Your signature footer should include your name, position, and the Company name.  Optional information could include your address and phone number

v  Capitalise words only to highlight an important point or to distinguish a title or heading

v  Follow chain of command procedures for corresponding with superiors.  For example, don’t send a complaint via e-mail directly to the “top” just because you can

v  Be professional and careful what you say about others.  E-mail is easily forwarded

 

Mobile Phone Policy

It is a criminal offence to hold a mobile phone or similar device in the hand at any point during the course of its operation whilst driving.  The offence applies not only to speaking or listening to a telephone call but also to using the phone for accessing any data, such as the internet or e-mail, and texting.  Consequently, in order to be sufficiently ‘hands-free’, the phone must have fixed speakers or a headset and be in some form of cradle or operated by voice activation.

Legislation also requires a driver to remain in proper control of a vehicle whilst driving.  This means that even if a driver is using an appropriate hands-free phone, its use in an unsafe manner which causes loss of proper control of the vehicle could result in a criminal prosecution.  In addition, the fact that the engine is running is sufficient for a person to be ‘driving’ even if the vehicle is stationary.  This means that hand-held phones cannot be used at traffic lights or during traffic jams.

If you do have to make or receive calls whilst driving even with appropriate hands-free equipment, this should only be done with proper regard to road safety and should be limited to brief and urgent calls only, with incoming callers being informed that you are driving and so required to keep the call short.  If you need to engage in a long call you are required to pull over to a safe, permitted location and completely turn off the car’s engine before making or accepting a call.

The Company requires all of its employees fully to comply with the legislation and this policy as a breach may result in death or injury.  When driving you are expressly prohibited from using hand-held mobile phones for or while engaged in the Company’s business.  Any breach of this policy will be considered a serious disciplinary offence and could amount to gross misconduct leading to dismissal.

Mobile Technology Policy

 

5.1.1          Overview

This policy is designed to provide WRBM with a straightforward guide to the use of mobile technology and the associated responsibilities of users and mangers to make effective use of the devices.  WRBM acknowledges that the use of mobile technology is essential to the efficiency and strategy of the business and seeks to provide staff with appropriate technology for business use.

Key Responsibilities

Users – mobile devices are Company property and are therefore subject to contractual terms and conditions of use and abuse of Company equipment. Staff must take all reasonable care to ensure that the equipment is kept in good condition and not lost or stolen.

Managers – all Managers are responsible for the recommendation and allocation of devices in line with the Company policy for their staff. They are also responsible for monitoring use of devices and their costs.

Information technology – it are responsible for the sourcing, purchase and technical management of the devices. IT is responsible for all mobile technology contracts and supplier relationships and will not support, or connect to WRBM systems, any devices which are not subject to these conditions. Requests for devices should be sent to it with the correct authorisation and justification for the relevant device.

Laptop Computers

Staff should have either a desktop machine or a laptop but not both. The vulnerability of laptops and higher support costs means that staff who work from home on a regular basis should be provided with an additional desktop pc, and possibly a blackberry, for use out of the office.  Wherever possible teams/departments are encouraged to pool portable equipment for staff use. This is a simple and effective method for reducing the number of laptops within the Company.  In order to qualify for a portable computer staff must satisfy the following working criteria:

v  Remote email access (in addition to the below otherwise a blackberry)

v  Remote copy filing

v  Remote sales contact management

v  Customer presentations

v  Remote development and/or monitoring of technology

Evidence that the job/role requires the use of a portable computer must be included in the job description of the staff member. As a guide users should spend more than 40% of their business time out of the office. Documentation supporting the above criteria must accompany all requests for portable computers and be verified by an ETG member. Use of equipment will be monitored with non-compliance to the above resulting in replacement with appropriate desktop pc.  Laptop computers should not be connected to any other form of internet access other than the secure WRBM VPN connection as these are potential source of viruses. Whilst all equipment is has full protection this procedure must be followed at all times. Staff will not receive a laptop until they have had a briefing and understood the access controls from it.

Blackberry

This device provides always-on email, calendar, contacts and tasks directly connected to the WRBM email system. It is ideal for staff who are out of the office on a regular basis but do not require a laptop for presentations or home use. The mobile phone facility is not generally available on this device.

Usage is monitored centrally and devices which are not operated on a regular basis will require fresh justification from Managers otherwise they will be returned for re-use. The blackberry requires justification and authorisation from an ETG Manager and should be based on clear business efficiency criteria rather than seniority.

Where required it can provide secure access to Company email systems on most mobile platforms. Please contact it to discuss your requirements.